My seafaring journey - Joseph Day

For National Day of the Seafarer on Saturday 25 June 2022, we caught up with Port of Aberdeen Vessel Traffic Services Officer, Jospeh Day, to find out about his journey in the marine industry.

Every year on 25 June, since its launch in 2011, the International Maritime Organization celebrates 'Day of the Seafarer' as a way to raise awareness about issues facing seafarers and the contribution they make to world trade. 

This year's theme is 'Your voyage - then and now, share your journey'. It gives us a chance to recognise and pay tribute to seafarers everywhere, whatever their voyage.

Here's what Joseph had to say:

Q: What is your job role at the port?

I work as a Vessel Traffic Services Officer (VTSO) at the port's Marine Operations Centre.

Q: What was your first job at sea or in the marine industry? 

My first job at sea was as a Deck Cadet. 

Q: What was the main driver for you initially choosing a career at sea or in the marine industry?  

The adventure and challenge.

Q: What are the biggest changes that you have seen in the industry since your first trip onboard a vessel?

Environmental change, such as changes to weather patterns at sea, and impact of environmental change on wildlife. The art 
of navigation has also changed, and today there is more of an increased reliance on electronic navigation techniques. 

Q: What knowledge and experience from your time as a Seafarer do you use in your job today?

Cheerfulness in the face of adversity, organisation of vessel traffic, and knowing what port calls require from a shipboard perspective, both in terms of personnel 
and operationally.

Q: What skills do you think you would have benefitted from learning prior to your move ashore? 

Economical driving, psychology, financial planning and more handy man skills.

Q: Looking to the future of the marine industry, what would you say are the biggest challenges for mariners and the people who are embarking on their sea going careers now?

Dependence on communications, job security, salary/financial stability, academia and training not keeping pace with changes in technology, and the reduction in number of seafarers required on board vessels as technology changes.